Jonathan Ketcham

Earl G. and Gladys C. Davis Distinguished Research Professor in Business
Faculty
TEMPE Campus
Mailcode
4106

Biography

Jonathan Ketcham, Ph.D. is the Earl G. and Gladys C. Davis Distinguished Research Professor in Business at W.P. Carey. Jonathan loves discussing health care economics with students, audiences on our local NPR and PBS affiliates, experts at companies and government organizations like the Congressional Budget Office and the Mayo Clinic, and anyone else who is interested. He has collaborated on research projects with Pfizer Inc, Banner Health, CVS Caremark, Symphony Health Solutions, FAIR Health, The California Health Care Foundation, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, and the Federal Reserve Bank. He is best known for his work that focuses on how, and how well, consumers choose insurance plans and how physicians choose drugs, devices and other treatments for their patients. For this work Jonathan has won research awards and large federal grants.Prior to joining ASU he was a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar at the University of California, Berkeley; he earned an undergraduate degree in economics from Baylor University and a Ph.D. in economics from the health care management department at The Wharton School of Business.

Education

  • Ph.D. Economics, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania 2002
  • B.A. Economics, Baylor University 1997

Publications

 

PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS

  1. Jonathan Ketcham, Nicolai Kuminoff, and Christopher Powers. 2016. “Choice Inconsistencies among the Elderly: Evidence from Plan Choice in the Medicare Part D Program: Comment.” American Economic Review, 106(12): 3932-61. Also NBER working paper #21387.
  2. Jonathan Ketcham, Claudio Lucarelli, and Christopher Powers. 2015. “Paying Attention or Paying Too Much in Medicare Part D.” American Economic Review, 105(1): 204-233.
  3. Andrew Epstein and Jonathan Ketcham. 2014. “Information Technology and Agency in Physicians’ Prescribing Decisions.” RAND Journal of Economics, 45(2): 422-448.
  4. James Niels Rosenquist, Jonathan Ketcham, Haizhen Lin and Kosali Simon. 2013. “The Impact of the 2006-2009 United States Housing Crisis on Antidepressant Medication Utilization.” Economics Letters, 121: 449-453.
  5. Jonathan Ketcham, Claudio Lucarelli, Eugenio Miravete and M. Christopher Roebuck. 2012.  “Sinking, Swimming, or Learning to Swim in Medicare Part D.” American Economic Review, 102(6): 2639-2673.
  6. Andrew Epstein, Jonathan Ketcham, Saif Rathore and Peter Groeneveld. 2012. “Variations in Access to Innovation by Payer: The Case of Drug-Eluting Stents.” Medical Care, 50(1): 1-9.
  7. Andrew Epstein, Jonathan Ketcham, and Sean Nicholson. 2010. “Specialization and Matching in Professional Firms.” RAND Journal of Economics, 41(4): 812–835. Also NBER working paper #14070.
  8. Saif Rathore, Jonathan Ketcham, G. Caleb Alexander, and Andrew Epstein. 2009. “Influence of Patient Race on Physician Prescribing Decisions: A Randomized On-line Experiment.” Journal of General Internal Medicine, 24(11): 1183-91.
  9. Jonathan Ketcham, Karen Lutfey, Eric Gerstenberger, Carol Link and John McKinlay. 2009. “Physician Clinical Information Technology and Health Care Disparities.” Medical Care Research and Review, 66(6): 658-681.
  10. Jonathan Ketcham and Kosali Simon. 2008. “Medicare Part D's Effects on Elderly Drug Costs and Utilization.” American Journal of Managed Care, 14(11): SP14-22. Also NBER working paper #14326.
  11. Jonathan Ketcham and Jeffrey Ngai. 2008. “How Similar are States’ Medicaid Preferred Drug Lists?” American Journal of Managed Care, 14(11): SP46-52. 
  12. Andrew Epstein, Saif Rathore, G. Caleb Alexander, and Jonathan Ketcham. 2008. “Primary Care Physicians’ Views on Medicare Part D.” American Journal of Managed Care, 14(11): SP5-13.
  13. Jonathan Ketcham and Michael Furukawa. 2008. “Hospital-Physician Gainsharing in Cardiology.” Health Affairs 27(3): 803-812.
  14. Glenn Melnick and Jonathan Ketcham. 2008. “Have HMOs Broadened their Hospital Networks: Changes in HMO Hospital Networks in California, 1999-2003.” Medical Care 46(3): 339-342.
  15. Jonathan Ketcham and Andrew Epstein. 2008. “Medicaid Preferred Drug Lists’ Costs to Physicians.” Medical Care 46(1): 9-16.
  16. Michael Furukawa, Jonathan Ketcham and Mary Rimsza. 2007. “Physician Practice Revenues and Use of Information Technology in Patient Care.” Medical Care. 45(2): 168-176. 
  17. Jonathan Ketcham, Laurence Baker, and Donna MacIsaac. 2007. “Physician Practice Size and Variations in Treatments and Outcomes: Evidence from Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction.” Health Affairs. 26(1): 195-205.
  18. Jonathan Ketcham and Andrew Epstein. 2006. “Which Physicians are Affected Most by Medicaid Preferred Drug Lists for Statins and Antihypertensives?” PharmacoEconomics. 24(S3): 27-40.
  19. Karen Lutfey and Jonathan Ketcham. 2005. “Patient and Provider Assessments of Adherence and the Source of Disparities: Evidence from Diabetes Care.” Health Services Research. 40(6): 1803-1817.
  20. Kevin Volpp, Jonathan Ketcham, Andrew Epstein, and Sankey Williams. 2005. “The Effects of Price Competition and Reduced Subsidies for Uncompensated Care on Hospital Mortality.” Health Services Research. 40(4): 1056-1077. 
  21. Daniel Eisenberg and Jonathan Ketcham. 2004. “Economic Voting in US Presidential Elections: Who Blames Whom for What.” The Berkeley Electronic Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy. 4(1): Article 19. 
  22. Patricia Danzon and Jonathan Ketcham. 2004. “Reference Pricing of Pharmaceuticals for Medicare: Evidence from Germany, the Netherlands, and New Zealand.” Forum for Health Economics and Policy (The Berkeley Electronic Press). 7(1): Article 2. Also NBER working paper #10007.

Research Activity

WORKING PAPERS

Michael Keane, Jonathan Ketcham, Nicolai Kuminoff, and Timothy Neal. “Evaluating Consumers’ Choices of Medicare Part D Plans.”

Jonathan Ketcham, Pierre Léger and Claudio Lucarelli. “Group Incentives and Standardization: An Application to Hospital-Physician Gainsharing.” Revise and resubmit, RAND Journal of Economics.

Jonathan Ketcham, Nicolai Kuminoff, and Christopher Powers. “Estimating the Heterogeneous Welfare Effects of Choice Architecture: An Application to the Medicare Prescription Drug Insurance Market.” Under review. Also NBER working paper #22732.

Jonathan Ketcham, Sean Nicholson, A. Sinan Unur and Lawrence Casalino. “Relative Prices, Payer Mix and Regional Variations in Medical Care.”

Kelly Bishop, Jonathan Ketcham, Nicolai Kuminoff and Christopher Powers. “Hazed and Confused: Air Pollution, Dementia, and Financial Decisions.”

Gautam Gowrisankaran, Jonathan Ketcham, Yujia Peng, Arundhati Tillu. “Do Physicians Learn about Technology from Experience or the Literature? Evidence from Coronary Stents.”

Jonathan Ketcham, Nicolai Kuminoff and Nirman Saha. “Revealed Preference Evidence on the VSL for Seniors.”

Jonathan Ketcham, Nicolai Kuminoff, and Christopher Powers. “Rejoinder to Abaluck and Gruber.” December 2016. https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2884875

Courses

Fall 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
HSM 512Healthcare Economics
Spring 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
MKT 352Marketing Research
Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
HSM 512Healthcare Economics
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
MKT 352Marketing Research
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
HSM 512Healthcare Economics
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
HSM 512Healthcare Economics
Spring 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
HSM 512Healthcare Economics
Fall 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
MKT 352Marketing Research
Spring 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
HSM 512Healthcare Economics