Edward Wellman

Assistant Professor
Faculty
TEMPE Campus
Mailcode
4006

Biography

Education:

University of Michigan, Stephen M. Ross School of Business. PhD in
Business Administration (Management and Organizations) 2013.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. BA in Psychology, minor
in Business Administration, Summa cum laude.

Representative
Publications


Wellman, N. (Conditionally Accepted). Authority or community? A
group-level theory of leadership emergence. Academy of Management Review.

Huang, G.-h., Wellman, N., Ashford, S. J., Lee, C., & Wang, L.
(2016). Deviance and exit: The organizational costs of job insecurity
and moral disengagement. Journal of Applied Psychology, Advance
online publication.

Wellman, N., Mayer, D. M., Ong, M., & DeRue, D. S. (2016). When
are do-gooders treated badly? Legitimate power, role expectations, and
reactions to moral objection in organizations. Journal of Applied
Psychology
, 101(6), 793-814.

DeRue, D.S., Nahrgang, J.D., Wellman, N., & Humphrey, S.E.
(2011). Trait and behavioral theories of leadership: An integration
and meta-analytic test of their relative validity. Personnel
Psychology,
64(1), 859-875.

DeRue, D. S. & Wellman, N. (2009). Developing leaders via
experience. The role of developmental challenge, learning orientation,
and feedback availability. Journal of Applied Psychology,
94(4), 859-875.

Research Interests

My research investigates how formal hierarchy interacts with
psychological and interpersonal processes to influence the leadership
activity that develops in groups and organizations. This exploration
involves identifying the conditions under which individuals who do not
occupy formal leadership roles will proactively engage in informal
leadership behavior and examining how different types and combinations
of formal and informal leadership influence individual and collective
outcomes. Using a variety of research methodologies, including
meta-analysis, field surveys, controlled experiments, video
ethnography, and social network analysis, I explain how formal
hierarchical differentiation shapes the leadership activity that
occurs in groups, but also how members of collectives can transcend
hierarchical pressures to develop more fulfilling, innovative, and
effective forms of leadership.

Research Activity

Courses

Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
MGT 530Influence and Negotiations
MGT 792Research
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
MGT 792Research
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
MGT 430Negotiations
MGT 530Negotiations
MGT 792Research
Fall 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
MGT 792Research
Spring 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
MGT 430Negotiations
MGT 530Negotiations
MGT 792Research
Fall 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
MGT 792Research
Spring 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
MGT 430Negotiations
MGT 530Negotiations