Major Breakthrough in Understanding How the Brain Works

October 8, 2010

Major Breakthrough in Understanding How the Brain Works

ASU Professor Helps Show Third Way We Learn & Make Decisions

TEMPE, Ariz. — Experts have long believed there are two main ways our brains work: 1.) cognition, which is thinking or processing information, and 2.) affect, which is feeling or emotion. However, a new breakthrough was just made in regard to a third faculty of the brain called conation.

“When people make ‘gut’ decisions or choices based on instinct, that’s really conation,” explains Associate Professor Pierre Balthazard of the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, who worked on the new research. “Conation has always taken a back seat to the other two faculties of the brain, but we were able to discover some key things about how it works.”

Balthazard recently analyzed the brains of more than 100 healthy people and found evidence they were all operating in the area of conation. Moreover, the findings indicate that people can be trained to compensate for strengths and weaknesses in conation, so their brains keep functioning efficiently, even in stressful situations.

Balthazard was already well-known for doing research in the area of how to map the brain for leadership qualities, using advanced techniques to analyze brain signals. His research is funded by the U.S. Department of Defense. In this case, he also worked with a world-renowned expert in the field of conation, Kathy Kolbe of the Phoenix-based Kolbe Corp., who has been assessing behaviors related to conation for 30 years. She created the basis for the new study, using data from a half-million people who completed her widely used Kolbe A Index.

“My theory was that conation is the one human factor that’s equal among all people; we all start with instinct, but it’s how we use it that gives us our unique character,” she says. “You can manage your response to a situation, but ultimately, you do that based on various strengths hard-wired into your brain. That’s exactly what our research found.”

Balthazard tested Kolbe’s theory by having subjects perform simple tasks. For example, he got a group of mostly high-level executives together at a table with several common objects on it, such as pencils and paper clips. He asked the participants to take one minute to rank the objects in order of importance. People’s strengths and weaknesses in the area of conation determined whether they easily performed the task or whether they found it very daunting and stressful. Balthazard could tell from brain-mapping the subjects beforehand exactly which ones would react in each way.

“We can demonstrate conative stress naturally occurring in business environments, too,” says Balthazard. “What’s important is to be able to identify people’s strengths and weaknesses in this area to help them compensate for various situations, so they aren’t wasting brain power and can keep functioning in an optimal way.”

Business, education and government leaders from seven countries and 35 states attended a conference this week that detailed the findings of the research. The Kolbe Corp. organized the invitation-only event in Tempe, Ariz.

Balthazard plans to follow up this research with more studies on the brain and leadership in the work environment. Kolbe says the current findings also hold promise for continued innovation in fields like organizational development, personal assessment, and behavioral health and education issues like different methods of learning.

W. P. CAREY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University is one of the top-ranked and largest business schools in the United States. The school is internationally regarded for its research productivity and its distinguished faculty members, including a Nobel Prize winner. Students come from 75 countries and include more than 60 National Merit Scholars. For more information please visit wpcarey.asu.edu and http://knowledge.wpcarey.asu.edu.